Serbia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2017

Eurovision Song Contest 2017
Country  Serbia
National selection
Selection process Internal Selection
Selection date(s) Artist: 27 February 2017
Song: 11 March 2017
Selected entrant Tijana Bogićević
Selected song « In Too Deep« 
Selected songwriter(s)
Finals performance
Final result 11th, 98 points (Failed to qualify)
Serbia in the Eurovision Song Contest
◄2016 2017

Serbia participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2017 with the song « In Too Deep » written by Borislav Milanov, Joacim Bo Persson, Johan Alkenas and Lisa Ann-Mari Linder. The song was performed by Tijana Bogićević, who was internally selected by the Serbian national broadcaster, Radio Television of Serbia (RTS) to represent Serbia in the 2016 contest in Kiev, Ukraine. Bogićević was announced as the Serbian representative on 27 February 2017, while the song, « In Too Deep », was presented on 11 March 2017.

Serbia was drawn to compete in the second semi-final of the Eurovision Song Contest which took place on 11 May 2017. Performing as the opening entry for the show in position 1, « In Too Deep » was not announced among the top 10 entries of the second semi-final and therefore did not qualify to compete in the final.

Background

Prior to the 2017 Contest, Serbia had participated in the Eurovision Song Contest nine times since its first entry in 2007, winning the contest with their debut entry « Molitva » performed by Marija Šerifović.[1] Since 2007, seven out of nine of Serbia’s entries have featured in the final with the nation failing to qualify in 2009 and 2013. After returning to the Eurovision Song Contest following their one-year withdrawal in 2014, Serbia’s 2015 entry « Beauty Never Lies » performed by Bojana Stamenov qualified to the final and placed tenth. Serbia also qualified to the final and in 2016 when Sanja Vučić performed « Goodbye (Shelter) » and placed 18th.

The Serbian national broadcaster, Radio Television of Serbia (RTS), broadcasts the event within Serbia and organises the selection process for the nation’s entry. RTS confirmed their intentions to participate at the 2017 Eurovision Song Contest on 5 October 2016.[2] Between 2007 and 2009, Serbia used the Beovizija national final in order to select their entry. However, after their 2009 entry, « Cipela » performed by Marko Kon and Milaan, failed to qualify Serbia to the final, the broadcaster shifted their selection strategy to selecting specific composers to create songs for artists. In 2010, RTS selected Goran Bregović to compose songs for a national final featuring three artists, while in 2011 Kornelije Kovač, Aleksandra Kovač and Kristina Kovač were tasked with composing one song each. In 2012, the internal selection of Željko Joksimović and the song « Nije ljubav stvar » secured the country’s second highest placing in the contest to this point, placing third. In 2013, RTS returned to an open national final format and organized the Beosong competition. The winning entry, « Ljubav je svuda » performed by Moje 3, failed to qualify Serbia to the final at the 2013 Eurovision Song Contest. In 2015, RTS selected Vladimir Graić, the composer of Serbia’s 2007 Eurovision Song Contest winning entry « Molitva », to compose songs for a national final featuring three artists.[3]

Before Eurovision

Internal selection

RTS announced on 31 January 2017 that the artist and the song will be selected using the internal selection, and the Serbian representative will be presented in a special program to be aired in March.[4] Tijana Bogićević was announced as the Serbian representative on 27 February 2017, while the song, « In Too Deep« , was presented on 11 March 2017.[5]

Promotion

Tijana Bogićević made several appearances across Europe to specifically promote « In Too Deep » as the Serbian Eurovision entry. Between 3 and 6 April, Bogićević took part in promotional activities in Tel Aviv, Israel where she performed during the Israel Calling event held at the Ha’teatron venue.[6][7] On 8 April, Tijana Bogićević performed during the Eurovision in Concert event which was held at the Melkweg venue in Amsterdam, Netherlands and hosted by Cornald Maas and Selma Björnsdóttir.[8] On 15 April, Bogićević performed during the Eurovision Spain Pre-Party, which was held at the Sala La Riviera venue in Madrid, Spain.[9]

At Eurovision

Tijana Bogićević during a press meet and greet

According to Eurovision rules, all nations with the exceptions of the host country and the « Big 5 » (France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom) are required to qualify from one of two semi-finals in order to compete for the final; the top ten countries from each semi-final progress to the final. The European Broadcasting Union (EBU) split up the competing countries into six different pots based on voting patterns from previous contests, with countries with favourable voting histories put into the same pot.[10] On 31 January 2017, a special allocation draw was held which placed each country into one of the two semi-finals, as well as which half of the show they would perform in. Serbia was placed into the second semi-final, to be held on 11 May 2017, and was scheduled to perform in the first half of the show.[11]

Once all the competing songs for the 2017 contest had been released, the running order for the semi-finals was decided by the shows’ producers rather than through another draw, so that similar songs were not placed next to each other. Serbia was set to open the show and perform in position 1, before the entry from Austria.[12]

The two semi-finals and the final will be broadcast in Serbia on RTS1, RTS HD and RTS Sat with commentary for the first semi-final by Silvana Grujić and Olga Kapor and commentary for the second semi-final and final by Duška Vučinić.[13][14][15]

Semi-final

The Serbian performance featured Tijana Bogićević performing with a male ballet dancer. She was dressed in a silver leotard with white flowing fabrics at the sleeves and covering her bottom half. She was alone on stage until a dancer joined her towards the end, also dressed in white. The LED backdrops were water themed throughout the song. Tijana Bogićević was joined by three off-stage backing vocalists: Jelena Đurić, Sanja Bogosavljević and Jelena Pajić. The dancer featured during the performance was Boris Vidaković from the dance club « Dance Factory ».

At the end of the show, Serbia was not announced among the top 10 entries in the second semi-final and therefore failed to qualify to compete in the final.

Voting

Voting during the three shows was conducted under a new system that involved each country now awarding two sets of points from 1-8, 10 and 12: one from their professional jury and the other from televoting. Each nation’s jury consisted of five music industry professionals who are citizens of the country they represent, with their names published before the contest to ensure transparency. This jury judged each entry based on: vocal capacity; the stage performance; the song’s composition and originality; and the overall impression by the act.[16] In addition, no member of a national jury was permitted to be related in any way to any of the competing acts in such a way that they cannot vote impartially and independently. The individual rankings of each jury member as well as the nation’s televoting results were released shortly after the grand final.[17]

Below is a breakdown of points awarded to Serbia and awarded by Serbia in the second semi-final and grand final of the contest, and the breakdown of the jury voting and televoting conducted during the two shows:

Points awarded to Serbia

Points awarded by Serbia

Split voting results

The following five members comprised the Serbian jury: [18]

  • Vojislav Borisavljević – Chairperson – composer
  • Ivana Peters – composer, singer
  • Tanja Banjanin – singer
  • Aleksandar Milić (Mili) – composer, singer
  • Ana Štajdohar – singer

References

  1. ^ « Serbia Country Profile ». EBU. Retrieved 3 October 2014. 
  2. ^ Halliwell, Jamie (5 October 2016). « Serbia: Confirmation of their Eurovision 2017 participation ». esctoday.com. eurovoix.com. Retrieved 31 January 2017. 
  3. ^ Србија поново на „Песми Евровизије“. RTS (in Serbian). 26 September 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014. 
  4. ^ « Izbor za „Pesmu Evrovizije » 2017. godine ». RTS. Radio Television of Serbia. Retrieved 31 January 2017. 
  5. ^ Jordan, Paul (27 February 2017). « Tijana Bogićević to fly the Serbian flag in Kyiv ». eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 30 April 2017. 
  6. ^ Kavaler, Ron (22 March 2017). « ISRAEL CALLING! EUROVISION PROMO EVENT SET FOR APRIL 3 TO 6 ». wiwibloggs.com. Retrieved 30 April 2017. 
  7. ^ Laufer, Gil (5 April 2017). « Tonight: Israel Calling 2017 to be held with 28 participating countries ». esctoday.com. Retrieved 30 April 2017. 
  8. ^ Jordan, Paul (29 March 2017). « Eurovision in Concert sets a new record with 33 acts ». European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 30 April 2017. 
  9. ^ Fuster, Luis (1 April 2017). « MADRID CALLING! 19 ACTS WILL TAKE PART IN EUROVISION SPAIN PRE-PARTY ». wiwibloggs.com. Retrieved 30 April 2017. 
  10. ^ Jordan, Paul (25 January 2017). « Semi-Final Allocation draw to take place in Kyiv ». eurovision.tv. Retrieved 25 January 2017. 
  11. ^ Jordan, Paul (31 January 2017). « Results of the Semi-Final Allocation Draw ». eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 31 January 2017. 
  12. ^ Jordan, Paul (31 March 2017). « Semi-Final running order for Eurovision 2017 revealed ». eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 12 April 2017. 
  13. ^ Serbia, RTS, Radio-televizija Srbije, Radio Television of. « Песма Евровизије 2017, полуфинале 1, пренос » (in Serbian). Retrieved 8 May 2017. 
  14. ^ Serbia, RTS, Radio-televizija Srbije, Radio Television of. « Песма Евровизије 2017, полуфинале 2, пренос » (in Serbian). Retrieved 10 May 2017. 
  15. ^ Serbia, RTS, Radio-televizija Srbije, Radio Television of. « Песма Евровизије 2017, финале, пренос » (in Serbian). Retrieved 12 May 2017. 
  16. ^ « Here are the judges for Eurovision 2016! ». eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. 29 April 2016. Retrieved 29 April 2016. 
  17. ^ Jordan, Paul (18 February 2016). « Biggest change to Eurovision Song Contest voting since 1975 ». eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  18. ^ Jordan, Paul (29 April 2017). « Who will be the expert jurors for Eurovision 2017? ». eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 3 May 2017. 

External links